Introduction:

Soybean field at harvest time

Biodiesel refers to a vegetable oil- or animal fat-based diesel fuel consisting of long-chain alkyl (methyl, ethyl, or propyl) esters. Biodiesel is typically made by chemically reacting lipids (e.g., vegetable oil, soybean oil, animal fat (tallow)) with an alcohol producing fatty acid esters. Biodiesel is meant to be used in standard diesel engines and is thus distinct from the vegetable and waste oils used to fuel converted diesel engines. Biodiesel can be used alone, or blended with petrodiesel in any proportions. Biodiesel blends can also be used as heating oil.

What Is Biodiesel:

Biodiesel is a diesel-like fuel derived from vegetable oil or other renewable resources. It can be made from soy or canola oil, waste cooking oil, and even animal fats. Biodiesel is made by combining the vegetable oil with alcohol [usually methanol but occasionally ethanol] in the presence of a catalyst through a process called transeterification.

Biodiesel derived from waste cooking oil is arguably the greenest liquid fuel available because the primary ingredient is a post-consumer waste product.

 

 

History of Biodiesel

Rudolf Diesel is the German inventor of the diesel engine. He designed his diesel engine to run in peanut oil and later Henry Ford designed the Model T car which was produced from 1903 to 1926. This car was completely designed to use hemp derived biofuel as fuel.

We may say the first vehicle biodiesel-powered was Rudolf Diesel’s prime model, a single 10 feet iron cylinder with a flywheel at its base, that ran with this fuel for the first time in Augsburg, Germany on August 10, 1893, later he demonstrated his engine powered by peanut oil-a biofuel, receiving the “Grand Prix” at the World Fair in Paris, France in 1900. Diesel believed that the utilization of a biomass fuel was the future of his engine, as he stated in his 1912 speech saying “the use of vegetable oils for engine fuels may seem insignificant today, but such oils may become, in the course of time, as important as petroleum and the coal-tar products of the present time.”

FEATURES:

  • FLASH POINT: 101 DEGREE CENTIGRADE
  • DENSITY: 860-900 GRAM PER METER CUBE
  • COST EFFECTIVE
  • NO CARBON FOOT PRINTS
  • NON HAZARDOUS
  • NON EXPLOSIVE
  • BIO DEGRADABLE
  • CARBON NEUTRAL

Benefits OF Using Biodiesel

Environmental Benefits

  • In 2000, biodiesel became the only alternative fuel in the country to have successfully completed the EPA-required Tier I and Tier II health effects testing under the Clean Air Act.

  • Biodiesel contains no sulfur or aromatics, and use of biodiesel in a conventional diesel engine results in substantial reduction of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and particulate matter.

  • A US Department of Energy study showed that the production and use of biodiesel, compared to petroleum diesel, resulted in a 78.5% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions.

  • For every unit of energy needed to produce a gallon of biodiesel, 3.24 units of energy are gained.

Economical Benefits